Washington DC Ophthalmologist Uses The Smallest Medical Device Ever Approved By The FDA To Reduce Eye Pressure Associated With Glaucoma

Dr. Hylton R. Mayer uses iStent® technology during cataract surgery to safely reduce eye pressure for patients suffering from open-angle glaucoma.

Washington DC – Glaucoma is one of the most common eye diseases affecting people over the age of 40, and it can lead to debilitating vision impairment and even total vision loss if left untreated. Dr. Hylton R. Mayer, a board-certified Washington DC ophthalmologist, recently performed the first iStent® Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stent procedure in the DC metro area to treat glaucoma in cataract surgery patients. The iStent® treatment is FDA-approved for use in conjunction with standard cataract surgery for patients suffering from mild-to-moderate open-angle glaucoma.

As a team member of the specialists at Eye Doctors of Washington, Dr. Mayer is excited to now be offering patients of the practice this exciting new advancement in glaucoma treatment. For patients with mild-to-moderate open-angle glaucoma who are also in need of cataract surgery, the iStent® implant can be utilized for reducing pressure in the eye that can cause a gradual loss of vision.

The iStent® is the smallest medical device approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and has been shown to safely reduce eye pressure in clinical trials. Dr. Mayer says this eye pressure, which is the primary cause of open-angle glaucoma, can now be relieved by this treatment when performed in conjunction with cataract surgery.

Since the prescription eye drops that are typically used to treat glaucoma can be expensive, as well as difficult to administer, Dr. Mayer says the iStent® treatment can provide a great amount of relief to patients suffering from this condition. Many iStent® patients use less eye drop medication after their procedure, while some patients may no longer need prescription eye drops at all.

Some studies have shown that more than 90% of patients do not follow their ocular medication dosing regimens prescribed by their doctor. In addition, nearly 50% of patients choose to discontinue taking their eye medications within the first 6 months of treatment. Dr. Mayer cautions his Washington DC eye care patients that discontinuation of medicinal treatment for glaucoma without consulting their ophthalmologists can be dangerous and lead to even more significant eye pressure. When pressure in the eye is uncontrolled, the condition can increase the likelihood of permanent vision loss. iStent® is considered an important advancement in preventing advanced stages of vision loss for cataract surgery patients suffering from open-angle glaucoma.

iStent® is implanted in the eye during cataract surgery. The device is designed to provide a permanent, internal remedy for fluid that is not draining properly. Rather like a stent used to prevent strokes or heart attacks, iStent® works to open blockages and improve the flow of fluid in the eye, ultimately reducing pressure on the optic nerve. Dr. Mayer notes the device is so small that it cannot be seen or felt by the patient after the procedure. In addition, he says the process of implanting the iStent® device does not significantly extend the length of the cataract surgery.

Glaucoma does not typically show symptoms until it has reached more serious stages, which makes it necessary to have routine eye exams to detect the condition before it gets worse. Dr. Mayer says, while the iStent® is currently approved for use only in conjunction with cataract surgery, there are a variety of effective treatments that can help patients slow the progression of glaucoma and reduce the risk of complete loss of vision due to the condition.

About Hylton R. Mayer, MD

Dr. Hylton Mayer is a graduate of Centre College and earned his medical degree at the Medical College of Ohio (now the University of Toledo School of Medicine). He went on to complete his ophthalmology residency training at the Yale University School of Medicine Department of Ophthalmology. A board-certified ophthalmologist, Dr. Mayer is also a fellowship-trained glaucoma specialist and has served as an Assistant Professor at the Yale University School of Medicine Department of Ophthalmology, where he was appointed the Director of the Cataract Surgery Section and Glaucoma Fellowship Program Director. Dr. Mayer is a member of Eye Doctors of Washington, an eye and vision care practice offering a comprehensive array of treatments including cataract surgery, medicinal and surgical glaucoma procedures, corneal surgery, and LASIK in Washington, DC. He is available for interview upon request.

For more information about the practice, you can visit edow.com and facebook.com/edowdc

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